About Naoko

Artist, art director, graphic designer, yogi, skier, adventure traveler

Food that I’ve missed in Japan

PestoSpaghetti

Pasta! Since I’m vegan and gluten-free, I couldn’t go to a regular Italian or a noodle shop while I was in Japan. Believe or not, it was very challenging to find a gluten-free noodle in any form in a grocery store. It was even harder in a restaurant. So, the first thing that I made after I came back home in NYC was pesto spaghetti with sautéed broccoli rabe. I used gluten-free Barilla spaghetti. I think Barilla makes the best dried gluten-free pasta. It’s too bad, they don’t make organic versions.

Rejuvelac

Rejuvelac

red quinoa rejuvelac, red quinoa sprouting, buckwheat sprouting

I haven’t posted for a long time because I’ve been busy cooking, baking, and creating vegan cheese for the last few months. I took a few food-worthy photos, but I have not been posting them, thinking I would do it later when I had a moment. Then I kept going missing the moments. Here it is my new science (Not!) project. I’ve been making rejuvelac to use as a fermentation starter to make vegan cheeses. Rejuvelac is soaking water of sprouted grains. I tried sweet brown rice (because that is my favorite kind of grain), brown rice, raw buckwheat groats, millet, oat groats, white quinoa, red quinoa so far. I like the sweet smell of oat groats and sweet brown rice. But they take for ever to sprout. Millet is cheap and fairly quick one to sprout, but it’s very difficult for me to see the tails coming out or not. Buckwheat is easy one to see the tails because their tails are fat. Quinoa sprout fastest. They sprout within 1 day, but white quinoa’s tails are also difficult to see. Tails of red quinoa are easy to spot against the red grains. These have a burnt smell and rejuvelac from red quinoa doesn’t taste as sour as other rejuvelac, but it works fine as a vegan cheese culture. Thus I’ve settled to use buckwheat and red quinoa to make rejuvelac.